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News & Events

TU Law alumni and student organization news and events.

Law Alumnae Honored by WLC

Law Alumnae Honored by WLC

The University of Tulsa College of Law’s Women’s Law Caucus presented Fern Holland (JD '96) spirit awards to two empowering individuals, Rachel Blue (JD '88) and Christy Caves (BA '02, JD '05). These women lead and inspire everyone around them. Congratulations!

Alumna's Transformative Gift

Alumna's Transformative Gift

Thanks to a remarkable gift by Sue Ann Arnall (BS '77, JD '80), the Arnall Scholarship Fund will offer academic, non-athletic program awards to African American undergraduate students or those studying in TU’s College of Law. “We want to break down barriers and pave pathways for bright young people from our state who might not otherwise pursue a college degree or may need assistance taking the first step toward a legal career,” Arnall said.

Alumna is Tulsa's Deputy Mayor

Alumna is Tulsa's Deputy Mayor

Deputy Mayor Amy Brown (BA '10, JD '17) decided to attend law school while she was a city council aide for Mayor G.T Bynum, who at the time served as a city councilor for Tulsa’s ninth district. "Tulsa and TU are special,” said Brown. “It comes down to relationships — you really get to know your professors, you get to know your classmates, you’re invested in one another’s shared success.”

The Honorable Carlos J. Chappelle Minority Law Awareness Day

The Honorable Carlos J. Chappelle Minority Law Awareness Day

The University of Tulsa College of Law welcomed 20 students from Union, Central and Booker T. Washington high schools on Feb. 22 for the annual Judge Chappelle (JD '80) Minority Law Awareness Day. These young visitors met with law students and professors, learned more about applying to college, experienced a mock trial and interacted with members of the Tulsa law community.

Employment for justice-involved people: barriers and solutions

Employment for justice-involved people: barriers and solutions

For justice-involved people, it can prove extraordinarily challenging to reintegrate into society – in particular, to find employment and housing – because they face not only social prejudice but also significant legal and policy hurdles. As part of their participation with the Lobeck Taylor Community Advocacy Clinic at The University of Tulsa College of Law, Kate Forest, Kelsey Harrison and Emily Turner conducted a study examining the barriers to employment for such individuals. Their report – Increasing Job Opportunities, Improving the Economy, Investing in Oklahoma – was commissioned by Workforce Tulsa and released in Tulsa on February 25, 2019.

TU Law students instrumental in gaining freedom for 29 prisoners

TU Law students instrumental in gaining freedom for 29 prisoners

Project Commutation relied on the involvement and cooperation of a number of people and organizations. These included the Oklahoma Department of Corrections (DOC), the Tulsa County Public Defenders Office and Family & Children’s Services. One of the most crucial groups was eight University of Tulsa College of Law students enrolled in the juris doctor program.